MMDA: Distracted drivers decreasing

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In this May 14, 2014, file photo, Ted Cardenas, a marketing vice president with Pioneer Electronics, demonstrates the new Apple CarPlay powered by Pioneer, featuring Siri voice control, while navigating through the Financial District in San Francisco. Car infotainment systems that use voice commands may let drivers keep their hands on the wheel, but they’re still highly distracting, according to a AAA survey released Thursday, Oct. 22, 2015. AP FILE PHOTO

The number of violators of the Anti-Distracted Driving Act (Adda) has drastically gone since the first day of the law’s implementation, according to the Metropolitan Manila Development Authority (MMDA).

As of Sunday morning, only three motorists have been apprehended compared to nine the day before.

Last Thursday, the first day of Adda’s strict implementation, 114 drivers were accosted through the MMDA’s no-contact policy.

MMDA legal counsel Vic Nuñez said the decreasing trend was a welcome sign that motorists have learned not to use cell phones while driving.

“We’re not after apprehending a lot of violators. We just want to promote discipline and road safety. We are implementing the antidistracted driving law to avoid accidents,” he added.

Violators caught on the MMDA’s traffic cameras can expect to receive a subpoena within three days. A fine of P5,000 for the first offense must be settled within seven days through Metrobank, MMDA-accredited payment centers or at the MMDA office.

Adda prohibits the use of cell phones and other mobile devices while driving or even while the vehicle is waiting at a traffic light or an intersection. –Erika Sauler 



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