Aston Martin offers a sneak peek of Valkyrie AMR Pro

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The first offical rendering of the Aston Martin Valkyrie AMR Pro. Image: Aston Martin Lagonda Ltd. via AFP Relaxnews

Due to arrive in the flesh in 2020, the Valkyrie AMR Pro is a track-only car offering F1 levels of performance but only to 20 lucky owners.

The new car is a racing thoroughbred version of the recently announced Valkyrie, a car co-designed with Formula 1 Team Red Bull racing that will offer levels of performance never experienced in any type of Aston Martin, but in a carbon fiber package that is completely road legal. And while the roadgoing version can comfortably be called the company’s first true hypercar, the AMR Pro version can easily be called the most ferocious thing on four wheels ever to roll off the Aston production line.

Just as with the multi-million-pound road-going version, this version (which will come with mandatory driving lessons) has been designed by Adrian Newey, the most successful F1 designer in recent history. It will also feature the same naturally aspirated 6.5-liter V12 engine built by Cosworth and Rimac Energy Recovery System to offer drivers an extra boost of acceleration or power at the touch of a button. But that’s where the similarities between the road car and the track car will end.

“With the track-only Valkyrie AMR Pro we have the freedom to create an extreme evolution,” said Newey. “While the core elements of the road and track versions are shared, every aspect of the AMR Pro —aerodynamics, chassis, powertrain and weight — has been optimized to significantly extend the performance envelope. It offers a level of track performance significantly beyond any previous two seat closed roof car.”

That’s a huge statement to make, but on paper, at least this car could conceivably match the lap times of a current-generation F1 or LMP1 car.

The car has a heavily revised exterior focused completely on aerodynamics and downforce generation in an extreme exercise of form following function. It will roll on comparatively tiny 18-inch wheels, but that’s so that they can be fitted with F1 or LMP1 Michelin racing tires. Meanwhile to cut weight and up performance, every unnecessary element, from the car’s heaters and infotainment system to its adjustable leather seats, have been jettisoned. The car’s cabin will be a very sparse space with two fixed, lightweight carbon fiber seats. Even the glass windows have been replaced in favor of ones formed from lighter polycarbonate.

Even the chassis and suspension system have been overhauled in favor of saving weight. A host of suspension components are now of the carbon fiber variety, as are the brakes.

But these changes mean that the car should be able to reach speeds in excess of 250 miles per hour and to be able to continue cornering and holding the perfect line even when experiencing forces in excess of 3.3g. Likewise, it can withstand 3.5g when under deceleration.

Little wonder that owners will need to learn how to drive all over again. However, the driving lessons will be conducted with Red Bull at its F1 facility where each car will also be tailored to each owner’s driving style.
“Valkyrie has always been about pushing the limits and redefining the possible,” said Aston Martin CEO Dr. Andy Palmer. “The road car will set new benchmarks for performance, engineering and technology — a hypercar in the truest sense — and with the track-only Valkyrie AMR Pro those limits will be pushed further still. It’s a remarkable project.” JB

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